How do you come up with stories?

A couple of weeks ago, I had a very fantastic (as in, remote from reality) dream: I was a clone of me, created after I was brutally murdered. But I didn’t have my memories; I only knew, academically, what “my” life experience was like, who was important in “my” life, what “I” did and didn’t like. Reconciling this purely academic knowledge with my sense of self and my emotions was taking a toll. I sought rebellion from this version of me whom I didn’t know and yet who was controlling me so thoroughly. I began acting out – doing what I specifically knew “I” would not do, while conversely seeking experience that might help me to understand… well… “me.”

I don’t usually have such vivid, developed dreams, but this is not the first time a story has come to me in my sleep.

Anyways, I took this to a friend of mine and we began to talk about ways I could develop this into a story. I was also considering how I could mold this into an idea I have for our next big game (our clone-space saga). My friend, though, kept asking me “What’s the plot?” – and I kept giving a premise – “She’s trying to reconcile with being a clone.”

When I gave a few more details, they were all world-building and character development-based. None of them really were based on a sequence of events I wanted to present. And I realized: everything I’ve ever written or imagined started with a person and a premise. Then I thought about what the person would do in such a premise and called it a plot. I can’t really envision another way of devising a story. In fact, normally, my first step is creating a character sheet: drawing out the character (whether it’s an illustrated story or not), writing out his/her background and characteristics, and maybe a few key quotes from said character.

She thought I could play around with inverting this structure: thinking of a series of events and letting that inform a character. So far, though, it feels as though I can’t even conceptualize a series of events without knowing the person walking through them.

Creating the Lotus war was probably the closest to this I’ve come, and that’s because Justin was beside me on it – but I still became attached to a Taya-prototype and an Arinnel-prototype even before we knew what the end would be.

So I ask in a spirit of curiosity: any of you out there plot-driven writers? How do you come up with stories?

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Characters in the Cold

Ren Jacket-Normal

Jtaya-normal

So far, I have two jacket designs down for the colder climate areas! The only problem is that we might not be able to make the battlers match the difference – though the travel avatars will.

What do you think of changing character clothing depending on the climate?

The Amazing Spider-Man 2: A(nother) Chick Flick with Superheroes

uncle ben

If you can do good things, or like… the stuff that isn’t bad… or you know… make the choice that will mean good stuff happens for someone, you should because of things and stuff.

I saw The Amazing Spider-Man 2 last week, and it’s taken me a full week to really digest it and form what I want to say about it. As a review, this will include spoilers, so don’t read on if you haven’t seen said movie or if you haven’t but don’t care about spoilers.

My number one complaint about the first Amazing Spider-Man was that it’s basically a chick flick with a super hero. I mean, there’s even a period joke, guys. A period joke. If that doesn’t scream chick flick, I don’t know what will.

Maybe a drawn-out “will-they-won’t-they” relationship with some dreamy guy with a dark secret… oh, wait.

But over and over, with this new Spider-Man franchise, the whole thing seems to be carried on the back of Peter Parker’s chemistry with Gwen Stacy – because frankly, nothing else about it is that great.

The amazing acrobatic feats that Spidey is capable of, for example, all seem incredibly CGI-ed. At points, it’s almost like watching a cartoon. Which would be fine if… you know… I paid to watch a cartoon.

Amazing Spider-Man 2 Electro Screenshot CGI Effects

On the other hand, it IS the most realistic cartoon I’ve ever seen.

It’s also quite long, at two hours and twenty-two minutes. I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again: not every movie needs to be Lord of the Rings. Thanks a lot, Peter Jackson.

It spends a lot of time telling us that Jamie Foxx is quirky, alone, idolizes Spider-Man (because Spider-Man’s careless with his words and cares more about how he is seen by people than he does about how they’re affected), and doesn’t have any friends because he’s just too weird and nerdy. Ryan from the Office ryans him around a little bit. Suddenly, because Ryan ryaned him so hard, he gets powers!

Then it spends a lot of time kind of re-treading the last movie: Gwen and Peter have great chemistry, but he’s afraid she’ll get hurt, but he doesn’t care about the risks because he just can’t help himself, and Gwen’s kind of perfect because she’s cute and smart and funny. Blah, blah, blah. He loves her, can’t be with her, is with her anyways, then she’s going to leave him, but he’s going to go with her…

It throws in Harry Osborn – albeit, the most emo, slimy little Harry Osborn you’ve ever seen in any iteration – as Peter’s best friend that you knew absolutely nothing about in the last film because he was conveniently in boarding school. They haven’t seen or talked each other in years, but clearly that’s the basis for the closest friendship Peter has!

The plot thickens: Harry Osborn is desperate for some of Spidey’s blood because if he can do everything a spider can, maybe he has increased self-healing ability that would help cure him of a deadly hereditary disease!

But plot hole, and the worst one of the movie: ok, so Norman Osborn’s bout with the disease set on while he was Harry’s age – around 20. Still, Norman didn’t die till he was at least 50. Why would Harry get so pissed off that Spider-Man told him “not yet.” That’s not a no. It’s a “we don’t know what it’ll do yet, so let’s get it tested and make sure it’s safe first.” But Harry’s all, “WHY DOES SAFETY MATTER?! I’M DYINGGG!!!!!” Dude, you’re not dying MUCH faster than the rest of us. Chill out. Plus it’s a hereditary disease. It’s not the same as a virus that your anti-bodies can fight. It’s something that might actually require gene therapy – not spider venom.

Because he can’t get it, he goes all crazy, teams up with Electro, raids the company that formerly belonged to him, and uses an experimental serum on himself. Sounds rational.

The end of the movie was expected for any comic fan. And there was a lot that was done well. Overall, though, I’d probably only give The Amazing Spider-Man 2 a 3 out of 5. I hate drawn-out movies, and more than that: I hate plot holes.

What did you think?

Introducing a New Elf Party Member – Jeth or Jerr?

elf guy normal

Jerr-Normal

Both are faces you’re familiar with from previous blog posts, But recently, we’ve felt the need to incorporate another elf into the party. This one will be another herbalist, like Arinnel – but while her forte will be in healing potions, his will lie in attack potions.

I was all set to go with the top one, whom we’re currently calling Jeth. He has a little smirk that gives him the appearance of swag, confidence and general cool guy-ness. However, to get him battle-ready, I’d probably want to alter his clothes a little bit (although Arinnel is decidedly unarmored). That’s when Jerr caught my eye.

While not quite armored, he does seem a bit more ready-to-go. This character, though, would be a quieter, more subdued young man. Stoic – aloof, even. He’d probably be of little words, though of strong opinion.

We’re not yet sure what we want from this specific character. We do know that he will be in love with Arinnel, and is very dedicated to duty. He will either fight with a bow or a staff.

What do you think? Jeth or Jerr? Another archer, or should I give one of Holder’s staff-fighters a sex change?

Introducing a Love Interest

Wow, it’s been a while. With our friends’ wedding coming up, it feels like less time than ever that we’ve had to blog, and with less new developments, since we’re both currently embroiled in detail-oriented, time-consuming efforts. Have you ever animated before? I hadn’t. And now I never want to again.

Anyways, a recent change to a detail of the story has led us to create a new opening scene, which means a romp through Ren’s home town before he arrives, much less graduates from, the academy (don’t worry; you won’t need to go through the academy. What does this look like, Ender’s Game? Great book, btw). So now, we have a scene with Ren and Taya in their home town (and Justin wants to omit Axel, as well), in addition to the time they spend together at the academy, then traveling to the elves’ forest. That’s a whole lot of Taya.

Bet you can't handle too much of this ugly mug.

Bet you can’t handle too much of this ugly mug.

Of course, no complaints on my part, because she’s secretly (but not too secretly) kind of my favorite character. But when it comes to balance between her and Arinnel, there’s not very much as of right now. Arinnel’s met what’s seeming later and later in the game, and you’ve already had this much time to gain relationship points with Taya.

A way to balance it would be to have Taya out of the picture for a good run after Arinnel is introduced – an idea I’ve been playing with. But Justin (who wants to change my whole idea for an ending just for balance’s sake) is actually ok with the disproportionate screen time as it is, saying that Taya is the “primary love interest” and Arinnel’s… back-up?

You know... just like in real life.

You know… just like in real life.

But sometimes video game love interests just genuinely annoy people and they wish they had a second option. I mean, hopefully that doesn’t happen with our lovely cast. But let’s take, for a moment, Yukari from Persona 3. She’s a whiney, uppity, better-than-you super skank. And yet she seems to be the main/”canon” (or what would be if they had a canon) love interest for most of the game – even though Mitsuru is objectively better. I say that Yukari seems to be the main because she’s the date that the game defaults to if you have crap social links with the girls. But I did say “most of the game” for a reason (Spoilers ahead).

When Aigis walks into the scene, the game takes a bit of a change in direction: suddenly this kick-ass mega-droid seems to take the role of primary love interest. Not only does she get her own cut scene, which (to my memory) no other love interest does, but she’s the one that’s with you when you die, she’s the one that inherits your wild card abilities, and she’s the one that quite impossibly falls in love (since she’s a robot and all). Oh, and she’s the only one that remembers you when all is said and done and the world is safe.

I’m not sure how I feel about introducing the canon love interest so late in the game. You don’t get as much time to bond with her, and especially in a game with such a diverse cast that includes total butt-kicker like Mitsuru (although she’s by no means my favorite combatant), you really feel that lack of development. Not to mention, she’s a robot so she’s kind of lacking in the personality department.

To be able to do that, you have to make sure that the character you’re introducing is simply, in a word, awesome. But with so little time to show personality, it’s kind of hard to do. Especially when your interest is competing looks-wise with someone designed like Mitsuru.

We’ll see just how the characters are written, and proof-reading will always come in handy. In the meantime, how do you feel about late love interests introduced in video games? Do you prefer the time to get to know the character or the excitement that comes with an unexpected introduction?

Psychological Thrillers and Character Studies

Typically, when you think of a game, you think of action. Kicking, punching, stabbing, shooting, exploding… whatever gets the blood pumping. Yes, there are real-time strategy and simulation games (I myself have been a huge fan of The Sims, Sim City [although I was terrible at staying in the black], and the Tycoon games. Oh, and let’s not forget my beloved Harvest Moon). But I think most gamers think of action/adventure RPGs, FPSs, or Arcade fighting games when thinking about video games. Heck, controllers seem designed for them. But lately, more and more developers are looking at gaming as a medium for storytelling, pushing creators into new modes of game play.

For example, Amnesia the Dark Descent fits especially into the psychological thriller aspect of gaming, and while exciting, there is no true fighting. You are hiding from a monster against whom you cannot fight back. The second he has you in his clutches, your game is over. Gone Home, which Justin reviewed a while back, is a character study, I think, but of the player’s sister rather than the player herself. And you might’ve heard of To The Moon, an excellently reputed RPG Maker game. Even players outside of the admittedly niche-market of RPG Maker have played this, and magazines have reviewed it. While I myself have not played it (too deep into creating The Lotus War by the time I was aware of it), I know enough of its Eternal Sunshine of a Spotless Mind-esque storytelling to know that it fits into this post well.

A comic book fan who is interested in interactive stories, this new genre is exciting to me. And really, less of a gamer and more of a writer at heart, it’s a very appealing genre – especially now that I’ve been taken with video game creation. What might its limits be, though?

Without action propelling the story forward and engaging the player, it all goes back to the story. The story needs to be good. And if the plot relies on a twist, that twist needs to be original, believable and engaging. I think the populace as a whole has seen one-too-many M. Night Shamalamadingdong movie twists to be taken in by anything less. The characters need to be relatable and likable and really – flawed, imperfect, real. We should have a real glimpse into the character’s mind or the world we are to explore. And I firmly believe that the character’s choices should matter, unless it’s one of those games where you just keep trying and trying until you get things right.

Our next game aims to be a bit of a puzzle game/character study, and I’ve been thinking (already!) of a sequel to that – although we have a large, epic sci-fi game lined up as the third, if all goes as planned. Justin and I have caught the creating bug, it seems. It’s wonderful, because this is the one mode of creation that really has thus far kept me enthralled.

What do you think of this new direction in video games? Do you like character studies/video novels, or do you prefer shoot-em-ups and swordplay?

How I Settled for Your Mother (Spoilers Ahead)

Back in high school, I had an awesome best friend. A lot of my friends thought we’d end up with each other, and I’m sure thoughts like that crossed both of our minds briefly. But we had different belief systems, life goals (and on the important stuff, to boot), and a completely different life trajectory. I couldn’t and wouldn’t ever have changed said trajectory for someone else, lest we both become disillusioned with the result. So we parted ways at the end of high school, and I eventually moved across the country and found a fuller love that didn’t require that extreme level of compromise. I love Justin – and he changed the way I view love. I know that I could never go back to an old flame for that very reason.

So when, like two or three episodes of How I Met Your Mother back, Ted finally let Robin go and we saw her float away like a balloon, I was ready. “Finally!” I thought, “A show that’s going to show life how it is! No more Ross-and-Rachel tropes! No more ping-pong! No more arresting or undoing of character development! This is it!” (Spoilers ahead) I knew that the mother would probably die from all the little hints that they laid out. I did. But with Robin and Barney finally getting married, I thought that they couldn’t leave Ted hanging that badly. So I thought maybe she was in the hospital, going up against steep odds with a potentially life-threatening procedure, and it would end with the two of them reunited or something. But nope… they spent nine years purportedly telling the story of how Ted met his soul mate, probably 45 minutes total showing us what purported soul mate is really like, one whole season building up to Robin and Barney’s wedding, and then it was all over within ten minutes. I mean all over. Robin and Barney got divorced within three years, the mother died, and then her children basically are just like, “Good thing mom died so that you can get back with your true soul mate Aunt Robin!”

A lot of fans, I guess, are happy that Ted and Robin ended up with each other. A lot of fans are pissed that the mother died. But this is what bothers me: you spend three or four seasons developing, say, Barney by having him realize that maybe he really can love only one woman at a time. He does these giant, grand gestures. He passes on his Bro ways. And then within minutes, that character development is chucked out the window and he reverts to the same guy we saw in the beginning. Oh, and then has a baby, and supposedly that’s going to change him. Hmph. We’ll see. Given that if nine years and a marriage to the only woman he ever really loved couldn’t at least make a dent in his Bro ways, maybe the thrill of a baby won’t last either. After all, there are plenty of invalid dads. Another character: we see Robin’s feelings for Barney are deep if not confusing to her, and she consistently picks Barney over Ted. She fed him a speech of her own feelings toward him for him to say to Nora, just so that he could be happy. She got over her trust reservations with him. Ted and all their friends were convinced of their compatibility/”meant-for-each-other-ness.” Ted accepted that he lost and was not right for Robin. And then all of that reverts, again, to basically square one of the first episode. She suddenly can’t compromise work for him. They struggle so long just to get married, but they can’t fight to stay married – not even for three measly years after NINE.

No one really learned or grew. And maybe that’s comforting to some viewers, because they’re still pining over that girl or boy that got away, and they want to think their life will give them everything they want. Because they don’t want to think about how letting go – really letting go – can help you to grow and become even happier in life. They want to be told that they don’t need to make changes because they’re great as they are now, and the universe will cater to their current status quo of awesomeness. But we’re living organisms. And living organisms change. We don’t always get it right the first time. The first time we think we’re in love, for example. Sometimes, we don’t even know what love is like. And rarely do we ever know who we’re going to marry until we meet that person randomly, in the middle of our life, and it changes everything.

If I had to sit through and listen about how my father had really been in love with someone else for twice the span of my entire life, and his entire relationship with my mom, I’d be pissed. And I’d be annoyed that my father was such a pansy that couldn’t let anything go.

I’m all for tragic endings. Sure, kill her off. Have Ted weep as he talks about it. Have his children console him in that, heck, they were born. And then have him tell them that you never see where life goes, and you never know who you’ll end up with, and maybe you don’t know that person now. But if you’re smart, and if you let go of the distractions, you’ll recognize that person when he/she enters your life, and you shouldn’t waste a second of it – especially not pining away after someone else who just was not as compatible.

That’s how I would end that story. Because I didn’t tune in to be bored to tears re-watching an over-used TV trope (will they? won’t they? Oh! Of course they will!). I tuned in to watch a story about a beloved mother of two children and how Ted’s entire life prepared him to meet her.

Creative Partners

I’ve always been a solo flyer. Back in middle school, I was probably the best drawer in most of my classes. Then Joanna Rodriguez moved into town, and I had to share that title – which was totally fine because she was a delightful girl. Moreover, up until then, my friend who’d moved over from Guam and I were just about the only kids in school who liked anime/manga. So having another girl around – the nerdy, artsy type who like Princess Mononoke and Sailor Moon and who could draw and play on NeoPets with me? Who liked hanging out with boys without necessarily having to like them? Who’d watch Toonami’s line-up of Dragon Ball Z and Gundam Wing? That was frickin’ awesome! It was a girlmance waiting to happen.

We immediately became a trio rather than a duo, and life was good. But dang it! I was just so possessive of “my” ideas. You know… we’d rip off of other cartoons and make our own characters, like ripping of the magical-pet shows of the 90s but with our own little spin. And whenever I found a new show to rip off of, she’d be drawing her characters, too. Man… I wish I had scans of our drawings to show you, but I left them all in my parents’ garage. That’s the beside the point, though; the point is that I’d start to get annoyed that she was “copying” me… even though honestly, I copied some of the things she did too (which she smartly pointed out). I think I eventually put those trifles to rest and we joined forces to create little narratives with our characters and magical animals. We stayed friends for pretty much the rest of school before the normal drift (I was in band, she was in tennis; I was in Block B, she was in Block A, I hung out with Mexicans, she hung out with Asians… what?) and are still on good terms. Heck, we’re Facebook friends! That’s legit! But that was really my first clue that maybe, just maybe *gasp* I was not a team player. For crying out loud, even back in school when I got a group of which I didn’t approve, I’d do the bulk of the work because I didn’t want anyone to mess up “my” project.

I’m getting better at it, because I have to be. Most employers want a “team player.” They want someone who won’t take new ideas or suggestions or discards personally. Friends, too, like to matter, their opinions valued. And the ultimate partnership, marriage, requires teamwork and communication. So what are my tips for working with a creative partner?

1. Communicate, communicate, communicate
Of course this is #1. Of course. You don’t have a team if you don’t talk. You have two (or more) people working on their own solo projects that hopefully converge. I’ve felt that way a number of times myself during this endeavor.
Because I’m mostly in charge of characters and the designing thereof, I sometimes feel out of synch with what Justin’s creating. He’ll show me a level he’s creating, and a little situation he was proud of, and instead of being proud with him, sometimes my reaction is, “I didn’t know you were going to do that.”
Ugh.
The best way to avoid these feelings is frequent and meaningful communication. “What are you working on now?” “What kind of ideas do you have going forward?” “Thinking of any big changes to the outline we had?” Not just asking these questions of each other, but asking them of ourselves and preempting the questions with our partners by bringing it up when possible.
2. Trust your partner
Not only should you cultivate trust in your partners through your project, but you should only partner with someone that you already trust. If you don’t trust this person to reflect the same standard of quality that you expect of yourself, you’ll only spend all of your time looking over their shoulder at their work, and not enough time actually doing your own.
When you divvy up work, divide it in such a way that each person does what plays up to his or her strengths. And when you can admit, “Ok, Justin makes music way better than I ever could,” you may find yourself able to let go of these tasks because of your confidence in your partner’s abilities.
3. Think it as “ours” not “mine”
That’s a bit of an obvious one, but perhaps not easily accomplished. It requires a measure of trust, as discussed above. But when you tie your name in with someone else, don’t think about how the work might affect your reputation. Your partner is an equal part in this venture as you, and both want it to reflect well for future pursuits. Furthermore, if you’re concerned about your partner’s feelings and reputation too, you will be given further impetus to produce quality work. Knowing that the other person feels that same way as you will help allay any anxiety that perhaps the quality is not up to your standard.
4. Write it out
Sometimes, people get into weird “debates” only to find that they actually have been agreeing all along. I don’t know why. Perhaps our diction is unclear, or perhaps we’ve afraid to take too firm a stance on either side of a debate because we don’t want to be offensive but thereby confusing the other person. I’m not sure why it happens, but it’s definitely happened to me. Or perhaps you really do disagree and talking it out is only making the argument heated.
Writing it out gives us clear communication, through which we can’t cut each other off and which we can analyze and re-analyze. We can read, take note, re-read, construct a solid point, choose clear words, and hopefully, through this, can come to a clear agreement.

All of this is easier to say than to actually practice, but that’s why they call it practice. We try and try and try again. Thankfully, Justin and I have trusted each other with a lot more for a lot longer, so this was easier for us. But trust is often hard-won and easily lost, and communication is a simple principle with perhaps more complicated factors (after all, everyone thinks and speaks differently; some are high-context, some are low). But when we view our project as worthwhile, that’s work that we’re willing to put in.

The Angel of Usui

I just started watching my favorite anime Initial D for a third – yes, folks, third time. And I just got to the point that always bothers me a little bit: Mako Sato, aka the Angel of Usui.

Most fans, I would imagine, are more bothered by the idea that the loveless Iketani finally had a girlfriend in his midst (spoiler!) – before standing her up for their over-night date out of stupid, blind jealousy over basically a celebrity crush and ruining their relationship for the next two seasons and the movie. Alas, we have never seen the two reunite. But alas! This is far more realistic than the happily-ever-afters we’re spoon-fed in American media; so while a disappointment, that’s not the point that bothers me.

Initial D, for those who don’t know, is a 90s (and actually ran through last year) manga/anime following the tales of Takumi Fujiwara and his fellow street-racers. Yes, in this series the main subject is a male-dominated world, it’s true. So I accept the absence of females besides for the occasional girlfriend. However, when they did finally decide to include a female street racer- well… let’s just say that it takes two girls to do the job of one boy, according to this series.

Yep, the best driver on Usui, Mako Sato, needs a “co-driver” in the form of navigator Sayuki – whose only job is to remember when tight turns are up ahead or whatever and to scream in her nasally, annoying voice, “Can you like- chill out?!” or “Mako punch it!” or “OMGEEZ! SLOW DOWN!!!”

So every single guy in the series, less talented than Mako or not, can drive alone and actually – *gasp!* – complete a race, but poor, simple little female Mako with feeble, feminine mind can’t remember her own home course – which she must’ve driven hundreds of times – without an annoying squawker in her passenger seat issuing orders. That’s the… only conceivable way a woman could beat a man?

Now, the series does make up for it later with the addition of Kyoko Iwase, who gave #3 driver Keisuke a run for his money, but that makes her basically the only full female driver in the series.

I know I talk about a lot of fictional women, what with my question about rabbits and guinea pigs, or my expression of love for Wonder Woman, or even my hang ups on Habibi. But hey, I’m a woman. And I’m a nerd. So of course I want to see my peeps represented in my favorite media!

While our game is definitely male-focused, our upcoming ideas for games let women take a spotlight, too, and beyond the mantle of eye candy or love interest.

What do you think about representation of women in shonen anime?

Swapping Out Females?

Justin and I had an interesting debate about the end of our game the other day. We’ve mentioned before that your relationship with either female character affects the outcome of the game, but to what extent has been our debate.

You see, I want a certain outcome for Taya to depend totally on your relationship score with her (I’m going to attempt to write about this while not giving away the end). I think that end, while in some ways not my favorite end… well… in other ways it’s a good ending; yeah, in a larger narrative sense, it is my favorite ending, absolutely and hands-down. It brings around certain plot points to a powerful conclusion that I think is very cool and very moving. Justin feels, though, that having such an ending for Taya necessitates an equal option for Arinnel, too. (Note: this does not mean that you if “choose” or girl or the other the event is triggered; rather, the event is triggered strictly by the number of relationship points you have with the character in question).

I’m going to use a totally fake example with no parallels to the real plot idea so that I can explain it better. Let’s say… if you have a high/low enough level of points with Taya, I want her to… um… get a bunny at the end of the game? A really happy, cute, fluffy little bunny. Because Taya… uh… has had a phobia of bunnies from the beginning of the game, and her getting one just totally rounds out her narrative. Justin feels, though, that if there is the option for Taya to get a bunny depending on your relationship points with her, Arinnel should also have the option to get a bunny… even though she hasn’t exhibited the same feelings toward bunnies. Just for symmetry, and not to show favoritism. By the way, this has nothing to do with babies.

My problem with both girls getting bunnies at the end of the game – which is a huge, game-changing event, really – is that the endings aren’t really different if we do that. It would render the endings the same, your choices won’t really matter; the endings would basically just be a mirror of each other. It’s not crafting a unique storyline based on the traits we’ve imbued into each girl. It’s treating them like stock-characters and plugging them in/out of one story. As much as I’ve made my girls out to be a bit of eye candy, I do agree that it’s time girls stop being just stock characters and start being… heroes, really. Or at least three-dimensional beings – not merely love interests (although yeah, that too).

Now, I’d be happy for Taya to get a bunny and Arinnel to get… a… guinea pig, or something, if Arinnel’s arc includes deep-seated feelings toward the little squealers. That would be fine. An equally important circumstance, although uniquely different to suit the character. That would be cool. It’s just thinking of what Arinnel’s guinea pig would be that’s the problem.

What do you think? Has media been lazy when it comes to developing their female characters, or do you think progress really has been made? Do you think it lessens the value of each character if their only function is to serve a particular purpose for the narrative of the protagonist?